Careem launches delivery service as it nears closing a massive round

The ride-hailing giant Careem is now in the delivery business as the company seeks new verticals in its ever-increasing fight against other services in the Middle East including Uber. Starting with food delivery in Dhabi and Jeddah, the company sees the delivery service expanding to pharmaceuticals according to a report by Reuters. Careem is investing over $150m into the service.

“We believe the opportunity for deliveries in the region is even bigger than ride-hailing,” Chief Executive and Co-Founder Mudassir Sheikha told Reuters. “It is going to become a very significant part of Careem over time.”

Called Careem Now, the service will operate independently from its ride-hailing business. It will have its own app and Careem is building the service a dedicated call center.

This comes as the company is trying to close a $500m funding round. Back in October, the company announced it had already raised $200m from existing investors. Prior to this announcement, rumors were swirling around the company that several companies including Didi Chuxing could acquire the company.

 

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K Health raises $25m for its AI-powered primary care platform

K Health, the startup providing consumers with an AI-powered primary care platform, has raised $25 million in series B funding. The round was led by 14W, Comcast Ventures and Mangrove Capital Partners, with participation from Lerer Hippeau, Primary Ventures, BoxGroup, Bessemer Venture Partners and Max Ventures – all previous investors from the company’s seed or Series A rounds.

Co-founded and led by former Vroom CEO and Wix co-CEO, Allon Bloch, K Health (previously Kang Health) looks to equip consumers with a free and easy-to-use application that can provide accurate, personalized, data-driven information about their symptoms and health.

“When your child says their head hurts, you can play doctor for the first two questions or so – where does it hurt? How does it hurt?” Bloch explained in a conversation with TechCrunch. “Then it gets complex really quickly. Are they nauseous or vomiting? Did anything unusual happen? Did you come back from a trip somewhere? Doctors then use differential diagnosis to prove that it’s a tension headache vs other things by ruling out a whole list of chronic or unusual conditions based on their deep knowledge sets.”

K Health’s platform, which currently focuses on primary care, effectively looks to perform a simulation and data-driven version of the differential diagnosis process. On the company’s free mobile app, users spend three-to-four minutes answering an average of 21 questions about their background and the symptoms they’re experiencing.

Using a data set of two billion historical health events over the past 20 years – compiled from doctors notes, lab results, hospitalizations, drug statistics and outcome data – K Health is able to compare users to those with similar symptoms and medical histories before zeroing in on a diagnosis. 

With its expansive comparative approach, the platform hopes to offer vastly more thorough, precise and user-specific diagnostic information relative to existing consumer alternatives, like WebMD or – what Bloch calls – “Dr. Google”, which often produce broad, downright frightening, and inaccurate diagnoses. 

Ease and efficiency for both consumers and physicians

Users are able to see cases and diagnoses that had symptoms similar to their own, with K Health notifying users with serious conditions when to consider seeking immediate care. (K Health Press Image / K Health / https://www.khealth.ai)

In addition to pure peace of mind, the utility provided to consumers is clear. With more accurate at-home diagnostic information, users are able to make better preventative health decisions, avoid costly and unnecessary trips to in-person care centers or appointments with telehealth providers, and engage in constructive conversations with physicians when they do opt for in-person consultations.

K Health isn’t looking to replace doctors, and in fact, believes its platform can unlock tremendous value for physicians and the broader healthcare system by enabling better resource allocation. 

Without access to quality, personalized medical information at home, many defer to in-person doctor visits even when it may not be necessary. And with around one primary care physician per 1000 in the US, primary care practitioners are subsequently faced with an overwhelming number of patients and are unable to focus on more complex cases that may require more time and resources. The high volume of patients also forces physicians to allocate budgets for support staff to help interact with patients, collect initial background information and perform less-demanding tasks.

K Health believes that by providing an accurate alternative for those with lighter or more trivial symptoms, it can help lower unnecessary in-person visits, reduce costs for practices and allow physicians to focus on complicated, rare or resource-intensive cases where their expertise can be most useful and where brute machine processing power is less valuable.

The startup is looking to enhance the platform’s symbiotic patient-doctor benefits further in early-2019, when it plans to launch in-app capabilities that allow users to share their AI-driven health conversations directly with physicians, hopefully reducing time spent on information gathering and enabling more-informed treatment.

With K Health’s AI and machine learning capabilities, the platform also gets smarter with every conversation as it captures more outcomes, hopefully enriching the system and becoming more valuable to all parties over time. Initial results seem promising with K Health currently boasting around 500,000 users, most having joined since this past July.

Using access and affordability to improve global health outcomes

With the latest round, the company has raised a total of $37.5 million since its late-2016 founding. K Health plans to use the capital to ramp up marketing efforts, further refine its product and technology, and perform additional research to identify methods for earlier detection and areas outside of primary care where the platform may be valuable.

Longer term, the platform has much broader aspirations of driving better health outcomes, normalizing better preventative health behavior, and creating more efficient and affordable global healthcare systems.

The high costs of the American healthcare system and the impacts they have on health behavior has been well-documented. With heavy copays, premiums and treatment cost, many avoid primary care altogether or opt for more reactionary treatment, leading to worse health outcomes overall.

Issues seen in the American healthcare system are also observable in many emerging market countries with less medical infrastructure. According to the World Health Organization, the international standard for the number of citizens per primary care physician is one for every 1,500 to 2,000 people, with some countries facing much steeper gaps – such as China, where there is only one primary care doctor for every 6,666.

The startup hopes it can help limit the immense costs associated with emerging countries educating millions of doctors for eight-to-ten years and help provide more efficient and accessible healthcare systems much more quickly.

By reducing primary care costs for consumers and operating costs for medical practices, while creating a more convenient diagnostic experience, K Health believes it can improve access to information, ultimately driving earlier detection and better health outcomes for consumers everywhere.

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Want cheap AirPod alternatives? Act quickly and grab ace Funcl AI buds for $54

We’re not usually keen on promoting gadgets that come from an IndieGoGo or other crowdfunding campaigns on TechRadar – there are many hurdles that smaller manufacturers have to overcome to get their products to you, even if they are fully funded, so they’re not always reliable. But we can’t help but be enamored with the Funcl AI true-wireless earbuds, if only for one core reason – their fantastic price.

At their current early-bird offer price, the Funcl AI true wireless earbuds cost just $54. That’s around £45 / AU$76 – and roughly a third of the price of Apple’s AirPods.

It’d be fair to be wary of the quality of headphones at this price point, with a relatively-unknown brand. But we’ve been testing the Funcl AI true-wireless earbuds for a while now, and with just a few days until Christmas, it’s a deal that still seems worth shouting from the hilltops.

Too good to be true?

The Funcl AI true wireless earbuds are sporting the sort of specs lots of sets in the category can only dream of. You’re looking at six hours of battery per charge with a case that holds 18 hours of battery for an effective 24 hour battery life.

Similarly designed as the Apple AirPods (but far more friendly for pairing to Android phones) they sit in a pillbox-like case that can happily fit in a jacket pocket, while the buds themselves (which sit on the end of stems) fit snugly enough to be almost forgotten about in the ear.

And, thankfully, they don’t sound half bad either. Many true-wireless earbuds can suffer from poor clarity and distortion, but the Funcl AI give the AirPods a run for their money in this respect. They’re still not as soulful as quality over-ears or wired buds, but do sound far better than their current price would suggest.

But that’s the stickler – Funcl has yet to set a final price for the AI earbuds, and could pull the current offer price at any moment – hence why we’re reserving our final review judgement. But while that offer price stands, we can’t recommend them highly enough.

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TechRadar’s downloads advent calendar: get Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17 free

The holidays are an expensive time, so we’re bringing you a special treat: a full, free Windows program to download every day until Christmas.

Peel back door number 17 on our free downloads advent calendar to find Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17 – a drag-and-drop website builder that will help you get your first site up and running before Christmas.

Download Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17, and install the software. If you're prompted for a license key, click 'Register' (at the top right) on the WebSite X5 Help Center, validate your email address and enter the following address to receive your license key: http://www.websitex5.com/magazine/trstart17en.

Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17 comes with a set of great-looking templates. Just pick the design you want (or choose a blank one), enter some basic information like your site title and category, then create your site map.

Once that's done, you're ready to start building your pages using Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17's straightforward site builder. Just drag an element (a text box, picture, HTML5 animation, media file or HTML snippet), then click the ‘Content’ button to edit it. 

Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17 includes a rich text editor, plus a photo editing tool that lets you flip, rotate and apply filters to your images without leaving the program.

Incomedia WebSite X5 Start 17

When you've finished, you can upload your site to the web via an FTP connection, save it to disk, or save the project file so you can edit it later. Don’t have your own web hosting? Don’t worry – there are free options available from services like 000webhost.com  and x10Hosting.

In case you missed it…

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10 best cheap fitness trackers: top affordable sport bands to keep you fit

Over the space of a few years, activity trackers, which started out as humble pedometers for step counting, have now evolved into powerful wrist-worn training partners.

The good news is that even some of the more advanced trackers that offer sleep analysis and heart rate monitoring can be bought for under $100/£100, and we’ve curated a list of the best among them.

Track steps, calories burned, heart rate, distance travelled and sleep with this latest generation of activity trackers. What they all have in common is they can help anyone go from unhealthy to fit and have an affordable price tag too.

We know that a lot of people are looking for fitness tech to buy their loved ones this Christmas and this list is a great place to start. That's because a lot of the options are good all-rounders, tracking a range of activities rather than being geared up for one specific kind of workout. 

With that in mind, if you know someone is super serious about running or training for a triathlon they might need a certain piece of tech to help them out. For everyone else who goes to the gym, pounds the pavement or just sits on the couch for now but has high hopes for getting fit in January, there's bound to be an option in the list below to suit them. 

The products below are an impartial list drawn from our in-depth reviews. So be sure to click through to the full reviews to find out more.

The Moov Now may be a few years old, but it's still one of the best movement trackers out there thanks to its 9-axis accelerometer – the same one used in missile navigation systems. As a result it can not only track your daily steps, calories and the like, but also other movements. That means guided, personalized training feedback.

The Moov Now can measure running impact, gym repetitions and swimming strokes, so you can work out with a virtual personal trainer that knows exactly how well you’re doing and can tell you how to improve. 

It’s also waterproof and lasts a good six months before the watch battery needs swapping out. Buy this if you're looking for an affordable yet impressive fitness tracker that doesn't constantly try to distract you from your fitness.

Read the Moov Now review

The Huawei Band 2 Pro is one of our favorite cheap fitness trackers because it offers a lot of decent features for relatively little money.

Fitness band features include your standard step and sleep tracking but it also comes with a heart rate monitor, VO2 Max sensor, GPS for when you're out running and it offers some good battery life too.

There's a very slim screen on the Band 2 Pro, unlike the Moov Now, but interacting with it is a little difficult and while it does show some notifications it's not always easy to read them. As an affordable fitness tracker though, there's a lot to love about the Band 2 Pro.

Read the Huawei Band 2 Pro review

Our third entry in the best cheap fitness tracker list comes from Chinese company Honor with its fourth attempt at making a budget device for your wrist.

There's an impactful color OLED screen on this device, which isn't something you're going to find on all the of the other trackers here. There's no GPS though, so you'll need to take your phone running if you want to know how far you've traveled.

The Honor Band 4 is one of the slimmest and smallest fitness bands you can buy on a budget, so consider this if you're looking for something slight that you won't notice sitting on your wrist.

Read our full Honor Band 4 review

The key addition over the entry-level Vivofit 3 is the always-on, color display that’s visible in sunlight. This is remarkably achieved without sacrificing the year-long battery life of the stellar third edition. Basic stats like steps, distance, calories and sleep are covered off, while there’s also automatic activity detection thanks to the Move IQ system. 

Thanks to the Garmin Connect app you can also customize the display, while setting timers and alarms directly from the wrist. Best of all the Vivofit 4 it also 20 per cent cheaper than the Vivofit 3’s 2015 launch price. Of course you’ll miss out on premium features like heart rate tracking and GPS, but that’s to be expected at this price.

Read the Garmin Vivofit 4 review

The Bip is a really capable but really simple fitness watch that we referred to in our full review as "the layman's Apple Watch" and we stand by the nickname.

In terms of a super rich experience and high performance, it can't compete with Apple. Not at all. But for its extremely budget-friendly price tag, the Amazfit Bip is a competent fitness tracker that has a few awesome tricks up its sleeve – most notably the fact it can last more than 30 days on a single charge.

If you’re after a simple wearable that can push notifications from your smartphone, wake you up with a dedicated alarm, and track your workouts with built-in GPS, and more, the Bip makes a strong case for itself.

Gift-wise it's a great buy for anyone who is in the market for a cheap and cheerful fitness device. Its simple set-up also makes it a good choice for complete fitness tech beginners. 

Read the Amazfit Bip review

Want the cheapest fitness tracker on this list? It's here and it's called the Xiaomi Mi Band 3, and it's not a completely useless device. In fact, the Mi Band 3 can do a lot considering how much it costs.

It comes with a battery life that should last around a whole month depending on how much you'll be using it, and there is tons of fitness tech built-in. There's no GPS, but it comes with a heart rate monitor and tracking tech for your daily step and workouts too.

It's not the most attractive fitness tracker you can buy, but it has a slimline design and it's light so you won't really notice you've got this on your wrist. The screen can show you stats for your workouts, and it's much bigger than the one on the Mi Band 2.

If budget is your main concern in your search for a fitness tracker, it's hard to go wrong with the Mi Band 3 from Xiaomi.

Read the Xiaomi Mi Band 3 review

Perhaps one of the more innovative devices on this list, the TomTom Touch Cardio is a fitness tracker with a built-in body fat scanner that should be able to give you a clearer picture of your fitness than most other trackers.

Press the button on the top and it will do a scan of your body fat to work out the ratio of flabby bits compared to what you should have.

It also comes with all the other tracking tech you'd expect, including a heart rate monitor and step counter to make sure you're doing your best to keep fit and healthy.

Read the full TomTom Touch Cardio review

There’s a reason Fitbit was one of the first breakthrough activity tracker makers and is still going strong today – it works. And in the case of the Fitbit Flex 2 it works well with lots of features for a low price.

The Flex 2 will do all the usual step, distance and calorie burn tracking using its motion sensor smarts, but it goes further. You can also track sleep and even do exercises that the band will automatically detect and track. Everything syncs wirelessly to the smartphone app and offers clear feedback to help you make health progress.

The Flex 2 is also swim-proof, comes in different styles and uses LED lights and vibrations to notify you about calls and texts from a connected smartphone. All that and it should last five days before needing a charge.

Read the Fitbit Flex 2 review

Although it's a few years old now, the Misfit Ray is an affordable yet very attractive activity tracker that should appeal to anyone wanting to make sure their wearable enhances their look.

There are plenty of muted color options to pick from and each features the same anodized aluminum central device with LED lights. There’s also a smart button that can be set to control aspects of your smart home, for example.

The swim-proof wearable uses replaceable batteries for a charge-free six months of constant use. That includes step and sleep tracking plus vibration alerts for calls, messages, reminders and alarms.

It's a top choice for Christmas 2018 because it doesn't look bland, plasticky and built solely for fitness. It's genuinely nice-looking and it can be worn on a chain or bracelet, meaning it straddles the line between tech and jewellery quite nicely. 

Read the Misfit Ray review

The Garmin Vivosmart 4 may have since been launched, but that just makes the Vivosmart 3 suitable for our best cheap fitness tracker list as the price has dropped down – and continues to. 

It's not the most affordable activity tracking band on this list, but it's one of the best looking and it'll show all of your stats on its small display including your rep count and other exercises too.

There's no GPS on this tracker, so this is very much designed for the gym go-er rather than a runner plus the Garmin app is second to none offering you all of your stats in an easy to read format.

Read the full Garmin Vivosmart 3 review

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